See why Denmark was recently named "the world's happiest country." The friendly citizens of this small nation value equality, individuality and democracy. As a gateway to Scandinavia, bordering the Baltic and North seas, its picturesque landscapes and extensive beaches complement its informal and relaxed lifestyle. The historic city of Aalborg lies at the center of North Jutland, a region blesses by natural beauty and the most hours of sunshine in Denmark.



Languages Spoken:

Danish

Education System

HIGHER EDUCATION

The overall responsibility for the higher education sector in Denmark rests with the state. The Minister of Education lays down the general regulations for all institutions of higher learning. Higher education is primarily financed by the state, i.e., no tuition fees are charged. Beginning in 2007, however, tuition fees are payable by students from outside the EU/EEA, unless they are admitted to a Danish university as part of an exchange agreement.

The only qualification required for admission is the Danish studentereksamen (upper secondary school leaving certificate) or an equivalent national or foreign qualification.

The university sector in Denmark includes three very large multi-faculty universities (Copenhagen University, Aarhus University and the Technical University of Denmark at Copenhagen), four medium-sized and multi-faculty universities (Southern Denmark, Aalborg, Roskilde and Copenhagen Business School) and one mono-faculty university (The IT-University at Copenhagen). In addition, there are a small number of research-only institutions. All university study programs are research-based, and degrees are awarded at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Denmark has a degree structure similar to the Anglo-American degree system with bachelor's, master's (candidatus) and Ph.D degrees. A university course normally consists of a three year bachelor's program, followed by a two year course leading to a master's degree. Three years of supervised postgraduate studies after the master's degree lead to a Ph.D degree.

The academic year is divided into two terms: the fall semester from September to December, and the spring semester from the end of January to May or June.

Visa and Residency

RESIDENCE PERMIT & VISA

All visitors to Denmark must have a valid passport to enter the country. Visa requirements to enter the country vary and are always subject to change, so it is always wise to check with the Danish embassy or consulate in your area before finalizing any travel plans. In general, students who study in Denmark must obtain a residence permit. Note that you may risk being sent out of the country if you enter on false premises, e.g. a tourist visa.

Students from Non-EU/EEA

Students from non-EU/EEA countries must obtain a residence permit (visa) before entering Denmark. Along with your official letter of admission (sent by regular mail), you will receive an ST1 application form for residence permit as well as instruction on how to apply. Do not send the ST1 form back to the university, but directly to the embassy. Please note you are required to present the confirmation of tuition fee payment you have received from the university.

Please contact the nearest Danish embassy or consulate immediately to apply for your permit, as the application process usually takes a considerable length of time (two to three months). Also, please be aware that the Danish Immigration Service charges an application fee for processing your application.

Furthermore, the Danish Immigration Service requires documentation of your ability to support yourself financially during the length of your stay. Prior to your departure, you may be requested to provide documentation from your bank certifying that you have the equivalent of DKK 4,200 per month during your intended stay.

For further information on applying for a Danish Residence permit, please view the Danish Immigration Service website.


A Note Regarding the Schengen Area

Denmark is a member of the Schengen area. Students should review the important regulations that dictate travel and visas within the Schengen area.

Culture

CULTURE

The culture of Denmark has some general characteristics often associated with Danish society and everyday culture. Modesty, punctuality but above all equality are important aspects of the Danish way of life. In Denmark, culture and the arts thrive as a result of the proportionately high amount of government funding they receive, much of which is administered by local authorities so as to involve citizens directly. Thanks to a system of grants, Danish artists are able to devote themselves to their work just as museums, theatres and the film institute receive national support.

HYGGE

One of the fundamental aspects of Danish culture is "hygge," which, although translated as "coziness" is more akin to "tranquility." Hygge is a complete absence of anything annoying, irritating or emotionally overwhelming, and the presence of and pleasure from comforting, gentle and soothing things. Hygge is often associated with family and close friends. Christmas time when loved ones sit close together with candles lit on a cold rainy night is "hygge", as is grilling a pølse (Danish sausage) on a long summer evening. These examples, although they do not precisely define "hygge," can give an English speaker an idea of a deeply valued traditional concept of Danish culture.

FOOD

Perhaps the most typically Danish contribution to the meals of the day is the traditional lunch or smørrebrød consisting of open sandwiches, usually on thinly sliced rye bread. The meal usually begins with fish such as marinated herring, smoked eel, crab or breaded plaice filets with remouladeand moves on with slices of roast pork or beef, frikadeller (meat balls), hams and liver paté. The sandwiches are richly garnished with onion rings, radish slices, cucumbers, tomato slices, parsely, remoulade and mayonnaise. The meal is often accompanied by beer, sometimes also by shots of ice-cold snaps or akvavit.

In the evening, hot meals are usually served. Traditional dishes include fried fish, roast pork with red cabbage (perhaps the national dish), pot-roasted chicken or pork chops. Game is sometimes served in the autumn. Steaks are now becoming increasingly popular. A popular traditional Danish dessert, especially around Christmas, consists of Æbleskiver, rather like small doughnuts. Æbleskiver are cooked in a special pan and are served hot with jam and sugar.

Daily Life

CULTURE

The culture of Denmark has some general characteristics often associated with Danish society and everyday culture. Modesty, punctuality but above all equality are important aspects of the Danish way of life. In Denmark, culture and the arts thrive as a result of the proportionately high amount of government funding they receive, much of which is administered by local authorities so as to involve citizens directly. Thanks to a system of grants, Danish artists are able to devote themselves to their work just as museums, theatres and the film institute receive national support.

HYGGE

One of the fundamental aspects of Danish culture is "hygge," which, although translated as "coziness" is more akin to "tranquility." Hygge is a complete absence of anything annoying, irritating or emotionally overwhelming, and the presence of and pleasure from comforting, gentle and soothing things. Hygge is often associated with family and close friends. Christmas time when loved ones sit close together with candles lit on a cold rainy night is "hygge", as is grilling a pølse (Danish sausage) on a long summer evening. These examples, although they do not precisely define "hygge," can give an English speaker an idea of a deeply valued traditional concept of Danish culture.

FOOD

Perhaps the most typically Danish contribution to the meals of the day is the traditional lunch or smørrebrød consisting of open sandwiches, usually on thinly sliced rye bread. The meal usually begins with fish such as marinated herring, smoked eel, crab or breaded plaice filets with remouladeand moves on with slices of roast pork or beef, frikadeller (meat balls), hams and liver paté. The sandwiches are richly garnished with onion rings, radish slices, cucumbers, tomato slices, parsely, remoulade and mayonnaise. The meal is often accompanied by beer, sometimes also by shots of ice-cold snaps or akvavit.

In the evening, hot meals are usually served. Traditional dishes include fried fish, roast pork with red cabbage (perhaps the national dish), pot-roasted chicken or pork chops. Game is sometimes served in the autumn. Steaks are now becoming increasingly popular. A popular traditional Danish dessert, especially around Christmas, consists of Æbleskiver, rather like small doughnuts. Æbleskiver are cooked in a special pan and are served hot with jam and sugar.

Health and Safety

https://www.isepstudyabroad.org/guides-and-tips/health-safety

Currency

The primary monetary unit in Denmark is the Danish Krone (1 DKK equals 100 ore). Coins are issued in 25 and 50 ore pieces, and in 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 kroner pieces. Notes are issued in 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 krone notes.

Major banks handle exchange transactions and welcome kroner checking accounts. A Dankort, or debit card, is the most common and convenient way to pay local expenses. It is also used as an ATM card. Every Dane possesses a "dankort", as it can be used in almost every shop and store in Denmark. You can get this payment card if you open a bank account in Denmark.

If you wish to open a Danish bank account, you will need to have three things ready when entering the bank. First of all, you will need to have a Danish CPR-number. Second, an ID-card is needed, e.g. a passport. Finally, you will have to have a residence, i.e. an address where you can be reached. In most cases, it is free of charge to open an account, but the bank may charge you - ask for advice on the different kind of options and the costs associated hereby.

Banks are open from Monday to Friday, 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Most banks have extended opening hours on Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. In smaller towns and villages, the opening hours should be expected to be less. The banks are closed on weekends. Foreign credit cards, e.g. Visa, MasterCard, Euro-card and American Express, are widely accepted in Denmark, but generally not in the supermarkets. Likewise, credit cards can be used in the many cash machines set up around in the Danish cities.

Denmark, although a member of the EU, has not adopted the Euro at this time. The Euro became the official currency of 12 EU member nations on January 1, 2002.  


To compare your currency to the Danish krone, see http://www.xe.com.

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