Taiwan was originally known as Formosa, or "Beautiful Island," and for good reason. Over 200 mountains, a beautiful coastline and an abundance of scenic landscapes make Taiwan an attractive destination. Whether you come for the excursions, the incredible Chinese cuisine, the friendliest hospitality or the best Mandarin language training available, Taiwan is certain not to disappoint.



Languages Spoken:

Mandarin

Education System

HIGHER EDUCATION OVERVIEW 

Taiwan’s educational system is quite similar to many other countries in the world in that a Taiwanese student has nine years of compulsory education before attending a secondary school. Before students can attend a secondary school, they must take national exams to determine placement at senior high school, vocational high school or five years of junior college. These national exams are highly competitive and students take years to prepare for them. 

There are 61 junior colleges in Taiwan. Students have the option to attend a regular high school and then attend a two-year program, or they can attend a five-year program after ninth grade. Students have the option to specialize in majors such as medicine, business, technology or languages. 

Upon completing junior college, it has become increasingly more common for students to continue on to graduate school. Prestigious institutions offer limited space which makes admission to a reputable graduate program increasingly competitive. Taiwanese students often apply to American universities and pursue their degrees in the United States. 

 

STUDYING IN TAIWAN 

Registration 

Check with your host coordinator for registration procedures.  

Course Load 

Students generally take three to four courses per term, plus any Chinese language classes, spending 15 to 20 hours in class each week. Terms last around 18 weeks, including exams and mid-semester breaks. 

Transcripts 

Check with your host coordinator for procedures to make sure your transcript is sent to ISEP Global.  

Visa and Residency

Visa regulations can change at any time and without notice. Students should always consult their local Consulate or Embassy to verify the most up to date visa information. All students are required to obtain a visa to enter Taiwan. Visa requirements can vary depending on the country your passport is issued in. 

 

Type of visa: 

1. Visitor Visa (if staying in Taiwan 6 months or less)

2. Resident Visa for the purpose of study (if staying in Taiwan 6 months or more)

Visa fee: $50-$130 USD

When to apply: After you receive your acceptance letter

 

Taiwan embassy in the United States consular services

 

Application Requirements:

• Passport valid for duration of stay, plus one copy

• Two passport-sized photos

• Completed application (Form Download ) with two passport-sized photos (color, showing front of face, taken within 3 months)

• Supporting documents or official letters of approval from an authority of the R.O.C. (Taiwan); this can include a copy of your visitor visa, and the immigration stamp.

• Supporting documents from host in Taiwan (e.g. Letter of Acceptance)

• Highest education diploma and transcripts

• Proof of financial support, plus one photo copy

• Original and copy of heath Certificate if requested (signed by a medical doctor, notarized, document certified)

• US Permanent Resident Card (for Non-US citizens, if applicable)

• If your application is sent by mail, a self-addressed envelope with return postage by Certified Mail, Priority with Delivery Confirmation, Registered Mail, or Express Mail is required (stamps only, no meter postage)

 

General Processing Time: 15 business days

 

Culture

COMMUNICATION STYLE

Taiwanese are generally used to meeting westerners and therefore know that a handshake is appropriate when greetings tourists. It is respectful to greet the oldest person first by not giving direct eye contact and giving a small bow.

Taiwanese have three names which mostly all have different meanings. If it is appropriate, ask a Taiwanese to explain the meaning of their name, as they are often delighted to engage in personal and thoughtful conversations. Sometimes, Taiwanese adopt American names which they use when meeting foreigners.

The concept of "face" is prevalant in Taiwanese culture. This concept is difficult to translate but roughly reflects a persons reputation, prestige, or dignity. There are three ways that face is used in everyday interactions with people:

  • Giving face, which can be shown through any selfless act of kindness toward someone else, or complimenting someone
  • Losing face is when some embarrasses someone else or directly intends to criticize or belittle someone
  • Saving face is when someone will apologize for their actions in a conflict

SOCIAL STRUCTURE / FAMILY

Family relationships are an important aspect to Taiwanese life. Family is solace in a persons life, and one must always remain loyal to family. Confucian beliefs influence family roles and relationships between people and government, men and women, and seniors and youth. Parents place great importance on teaching children to fulfill family duties and to respect those older than them.

FOOD

Sharing meals and communal dining is a very important aspect of Taiwanese culture. The most common ingredients in Taiwanese food are pork, seafood, rice, and soy. Most dishes are comprised of these items but will then add unique spices to change the flavor of each dish.

Peanuts, sesame oil, mustard greens, chili peppers, and cilantro are all common spices used to enrich Taiwanese dishes. Some variations of Chinese dishes are also common in Taiwan. Taiwan is one of the best places to indulge in great seafood, such as cuttlefish, tuna, squid, etc.

HOLIDAYS

One of the biggest holidays celebrated in Taiwan is Chinese New Year, around early February. It is tradition for families to gather together in their homes, exchange gifts, eat an extravagant meal, and celebrate with fireworks.

Daily Life

COMMUNICATION STYLE

Taiwanese are generally used to meeting westerners and therefore know that a handshake is appropriate when greetings tourists. It is respectful to greet the oldest person first by not giving direct eye contact and giving a small bow.

Taiwanese have three names which mostly all have different meanings. If it is appropriate, ask a Taiwanese to explain the meaning of their name, as they are often delighted to engage in personal and thoughtful conversations. Sometimes, Taiwanese adopt American names which they use when meeting foreigners.

The concept of "face" is prevalant in Taiwanese culture. This concept is difficult to translate but roughly reflects a persons reputation, prestige, or dignity. There are three ways that face is used in everyday interactions with people:

  • Giving face, which can be shown through any selfless act of kindness toward someone else, or complimenting someone
  • Losing face is when some embarrasses someone else or directly intends to criticize or belittle someone
  • Saving face is when someone will apologize for their actions in a conflict

SOCIAL STRUCTURE / FAMILY

Family relationships are an important aspect to Taiwanese life. Family is solace in a persons life, and one must always remain loyal to family. Confucian beliefs influence family roles and relationships between people and government, men and women, and seniors and youth. Parents place great importance on teaching children to fulfill family duties and to respect those older than them.

FOOD

Sharing meals and communal dining is a very important aspect of Taiwanese culture. The most common ingredients in Taiwanese food are pork, seafood, rice, and soy. Most dishes are comprised of these items but will then add unique spices to change the flavor of each dish.

Peanuts, sesame oil, mustard greens, chili peppers, and cilantro are all common spices used to enrich Taiwanese dishes. Some variations of Chinese dishes are also common in Taiwan. Taiwan is one of the best places to indulge in great seafood, such as cuttlefish, tuna, squid, etc.

HOLIDAYS

One of the biggest holidays celebrated in Taiwan is Chinese New Year, around early February. It is tradition for families to gather together in their homes, exchange gifts, eat an extravagant meal, and celebrate with fireworks.

Health and Safety

Your health and safety is our number one priority. Please read and reference our Guides and Tips section for general information regarding health and safety abroad. 

Detailed information about Taiwan can be found here. Please pay special attention to the Safety and Security, Local Laws and Special Circumstances and Health sections. 

Note: Information sourced on this page is provided by the U.S. Department of State. Non-U.S. nationals should disregard the Embassies and Consulates and Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements sections. 

If you are planning to bring your prescription or over-the-counter medicine on your trip, you need to make sure your medicine is travel-ready.  

Currency

MONEY MATTERS

Taiwan’s currency is the New Taiwanese Dollar (NT). Bills come in denominations of NT50, NT100, NT200, NT500, NT1000 and NT2000, while coins come in units of NT1, NT5, NT10 and NT50.

Cash payment is common in Taiwan though many shops do accept credit cards. Checks are not normally used in Taiwan for payment of everyday expenses.

Generally, hotels and department stores accept credit cards, especially Visa and Master Card. Most restaurants and small stores do not accept cards, and cash is the main form of payment. Because street crime is rare, it is common for people in Taiwan to carry large amounts of cash with them.

Please see the following link for currency conversion rates: http://www.xe.com/

ATMs

ATMs are an easy way to withdraw cash from the bank account at your home country. In urban areas, ATMs are can be found in places like convenient stores. Remember that there may be limits on the amount of cash that can be withdrawn per transaction or per day, and that your home financial institution may charge a fee on withdrawals from other banks.

PRICES

Although Taiwan is more expensive by Asian standards, it is still significantly cheaper than Japan. Night markets are a great place to visit for bargain shopping. Haggling is accepted and expected. Note that tipping is generally not practiced in taxis or restaurants.

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