Argentina is a traveler's paradise with a blend of European and South American traditions that form a unique heritage all its own. By studying at an ISEP member university in Argentina, you have the chance to discover more of what the country has to offer. Argentina is home to stunning architecture, a thriving rock music scene, a popular film industry and world-renowned works of art and literature. From Iguazú Falls in the Northeast to the rugged peaks of the Andes mountain range in the West, and from the glaciers of the South to the breathtaking beaches of the Atlantic coast, you will never run out of places to explore in Argentina.



Languages Spoken:

Spanish

Education System

HIGHER EDUCATION OVERVIEW

Higher education is provided in three types of institutions: national, provincial and private universities; institutions of technical and professional studies; and teacher-training colleges.

At the university level, the first one to two years are devoted to the study of basic subjects. The total program of study lasts five or six years and leads to a licenciatura or to a professional title. Some universities award a bachillerato universitario after four years. A master's degree is granted after two more years of study at certain universities. The doctorado, the highest degree, is usually awarded two to three years after the licenciatura upon submission of a thesis.

Argentina's academic calendar is on the Southern Hemisphere schedule, with classes usually beginning in March and ending in December.

 

STUDYING IN ARGENTINA

Courses

Courses are offered in a wide variety of fields of study including Latin American Studies, Business, Agriculture, International Affairs, Architecture and Political Science. As an ISEP participant, you can enroll in classes in English or Spanish, depending on your institution. Students who wish to take courses in Spanish must have a B1 or B2 level of Spanish in most cases.

Registration

Registration for courses is different for each institution. Please check with your host institution for registration procedures, as it often occurs before the term begins, and in some cases requires mailed-in forms.

Course Load

Students in Argentina will enroll in three to five courses per term, depending on your institution, totaling around 20 hours per week of in-class time.

Your home institution sets the policy regarding the award of credit for coursework completed on an ISEP exchange. You are responsible for knowing your home institution's policies and procedures regarding this matter.

Exams & Grading

Lecturing is the principal method of instruction in Latin American universities, with one final exam or paper counting as the only grade in the class. Some professors will also give midterm exams or papers. In most Latin American countries, the grading philosophy is that the student starts at 0 (no knowledge of the subject) and must work to obtain a good grade. The student’s grade rises as they acquire knowledge throughout the semester. As such, Latin American universities tend to be severe in their grading and a grade of sobresaliente (ten—the highest grade possible in Argentina) is rarely awarded. In most classes, the majority of students will receive either aprobado or muy bueno (from four to six).

Transcripts

Transcripts are issued in most cases to ISEP automatically, either digitally or as hard copies. Check with your host institution directly, as some require you to request these records.

Visa and Residency

COVID-19 Update: Visa and Residency guidelines may have changed from the details below as a result of COVID-19. Students should review the Special Conditions of Placement in their ISEP Acceptance Package for the most current information. 

 

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If you do not have your passport already, you should obtain it immediately.  A passport valid for at least six months beyond the last date of studies in Argentina is part of the required documentation for entry into Argentina. Your host university will also request a copy of your passport by a certain deadline for visa and admission purposes, and failure to meet this deadline could have serious consequences.

Students studying abroad in Argentina for less than 90 days (summer programs) do not require a visa

VISA APPLICATION GUIDELINES

Per the latest guidance from Argentina's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, students who wish to study for more than 90 days must process a Student Visa at the Argentine Consulate for their jurisdiction BEFORE entering Argentina.

Together with the Acceptance Letter, host universities will provide important documentation so that students may initiate the Visa process directly with the Argentine Consulate serving their jurisdiction. For your host university to issue these important documents, students must complete all internal applications as soon as they accept their ISEP program. The acceptance materials from your host university will fulfil requirements 4, 5, and 6 from the list below.

The visa application fee is 150 US dollars or euros, depending on the Consular Office where the application is filed. The fee must be paid in the local currency of the country where the student is applying. Some consulates will allow students to submit visa application materials by mail, but most consulates require an in-person visa appointment. All visa application fees and any visa-related travel costs are the responsibility of the student. 

To allow for adequate visa processing time, students should submit their completed online application to the consulate no less than 45 working days in advance of their departure for Argentina. Students may submit their application materials starting 90 days in advance of their departure for Argentina and are encouraged to start the visa application process as soon as possible. 

REQUIRED DOCUMENTS

Students should consult the official student visa requirements and start to assemble all required documents as soon as possible.

IMPORTANT: Documentation requirements differ by consulate, so review the specific Student Visa application instructions (Student Visa - less than 365 days) provided by the consulate serving your jurisdiction to confirm requirements and procedures before beginning your application.

Below is a sample list of the documents generally required for the Student Visa (actual requirements may vary by consulate). An original and a copy of each required document must be presented at the Consular Office serving your jurisdiction:

1. Passport valid for at least six (6) months at the time of entering Argentina, with at least two (2) blank pages.

2. Two (2) current 4 x 4 cm photographs, facing the camera, printed in color, on a white background.

3. Visa application form filled out (preferably in electronic format) and signed by the applicant.

4. Program of study. (Provided by your host institution in Argentina)

5. Electronic filing of the student data by the educational institution in the National Directorate of Migration. (Provided by your host institution in Argentina)

6. Host university's proof of registration with the National Registry of Petitioners on behalf of Foreign Applicants of Argentina (RENURE) and inscription number. (Provided by your host institution in Argentina)

7. Proof of sufficient funds to cover stay and study expenses (consular authorities may request copies of bank account statements, credit card statements, or other documentation - check requirements of your specific consulate).

ONLY for students who will be studying in Argentina for a period exceeding 6 months:

8. An apostilled or legalized certificate of good conduct issued by the competent authority of the countries where you have resided for more than one year over the previous three years.

- If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident obtaining an FBI Background Check as your Certificate of Absence of Police Record, you must obtain the Apostille Seal of The Hague from the U.S. Department of State. Individual states cannot authenticate the FBI Background Check as it is a federal document. When requesting your FBI Background Check, you should submit a request that the document include the FBI seal and the signature of a division official. You will need the signature and seal to obtain the Apostille Seal of the Hague from the U.S. Department of State.

- If you are not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and you are required to present your national-level background check with the Apostille Seal of the Hague, visit this site to find the appropriate authority in your home country. Scroll down and click on your home country to find more information about whom to contact. 

9. Commitment to tell the truth and/or sworn affidavit of your lack of a criminal record in other countries, signed before the consul. (confirm requirements with your specific consulate)

Updated: September 23, 2020

Culture

COMMUNICATION STYLE

Argentineans tend to be open, blunt and direct, yet are able to remain tactful and diplomatic. They are a warm people and their unreservedness brings to the fore their passion and sentimentality. They are generally quite outgoing and sociable people.

GREETINGS

Initial greetings are formal and follow a set protocol of greeting the eldest or most important person first. A standard handshake, with direct eye contact and a welcoming smile will suffice. Typically Argentinean friends greet each other and say goodbye with a kiss on each cheek. Maintaining eye contact indicates interest. In general, Argentineans prefer third-party introductions, so you should wait for your host or hostess to introduce you to others at a small gathering. When leaving, say goodbye to each person individually.

FOOD

Getting used to Argentinian food and meal times may take some time, depending on your home country. In general, breakfast is very light and usually consists of some type of bread product. Cereal, French bread with jam and medialunas (similar to small croissants) are all common breakfast foods. A small cup of instant coffee is also a favorite among Argentines. Lunch is the largest meal of the day and usually takes place between 1:30 - 3 p.m. Many businesses close in observance of the afternoon siesta, so it can be hard to plan on doing your errands after lunch. Dinner is usually eaten no earlier than 9 p.m. Argentines tend to follow these standard mealtime practices relatively closely. Restaurants generally don't open before 7:30 or 8 p.m. for dinner.

Beef, empanadas, Italian food, hamburgers, very sweet desserts and milanesa (a breaded and fried type of thin steak) are all common in Argentina. Authentic ‘ethnic' food is rarely found outside of Buenos Aires. You will also see people drinking yerba mate, a loose tea-like beverage that comes from a specific type of Argentine bush. Drinking mate is a very common custom in Argentina and Uruguay. Argentines mostly drink mate at work, during class, at home with friends, while studying, during an afternoon snack and sometimes at a café. In Uruguay, it is even more common to see people drinking mate just about anywhere and everywhere. When sharing mate with a group of people, say "gracias" only after you are finished taking all of your desired turns. The actual plant material is referred to as yerba or yerba mate, and the container from which you drink yerba is called a mate. The metal ‘straw' used with mate is called a bombilla. Drinking mate is a common reason for a person to stop what they’re doing, relax a little and enjoy conversation with friends and co-workers.

FAMILY

Argentineans usually live at home until they get married, so many of your Argentinean friends will still be living at home. People generally don't move far from the town or city where they grow up and typically stay close to an extended family network throughout their whole life. High value is placed on kinship, and a special relationship and even responsibility is expected among extended family members. Argentines are close communicators physically and will often touch each other when speaking and maintain little physical distance between speakers.

Daily Life

COMMUNICATION STYLE

Argentineans tend to be open, blunt and direct, yet are able to remain tactful and diplomatic. They are a warm people and their unreservedness brings to the fore their passion and sentimentality. They are generally quite outgoing and sociable people.

GREETINGS

Initial greetings are formal and follow a set protocol of greeting the eldest or most important person first. A standard handshake, with direct eye contact and a welcoming smile will suffice. Typically Argentinean friends greet each other and say goodbye with a kiss on each cheek. Maintaining eye contact indicates interest. In general, Argentineans prefer third-party introductions, so you should wait for your host or hostess to introduce you to others at a small gathering. When leaving, say goodbye to each person individually.

FOOD

Getting used to Argentinian food and meal times may take some time, depending on your home country. In general, breakfast is very light and usually consists of some type of bread product. Cereal, French bread with jam and medialunas (similar to small croissants) are all common breakfast foods. A small cup of instant coffee is also a favorite among Argentines. Lunch is the largest meal of the day and usually takes place between 1:30 - 3 p.m. Many businesses close in observance of the afternoon siesta, so it can be hard to plan on doing your errands after lunch. Dinner is usually eaten no earlier than 9 p.m. Argentines tend to follow these standard mealtime practices relatively closely. Restaurants generally don't open before 7:30 or 8 p.m. for dinner.

Beef, empanadas, Italian food, hamburgers, very sweet desserts and milanesa (a breaded and fried type of thin steak) are all common in Argentina. Authentic ‘ethnic' food is rarely found outside of Buenos Aires. You will also see people drinking yerba mate, a loose tea-like beverage that comes from a specific type of Argentine bush. Drinking mate is a very common custom in Argentina and Uruguay. Argentines mostly drink mate at work, during class, at home with friends, while studying, during an afternoon snack and sometimes at a café. In Uruguay, it is even more common to see people drinking mate just about anywhere and everywhere. When sharing mate with a group of people, say "gracias" only after you are finished taking all of your desired turns. The actual plant material is referred to as yerba or yerba mate, and the container from which you drink yerba is called a mate. The metal ‘straw' used with mate is called a bombilla. Drinking mate is a common reason for a person to stop what they’re doing, relax a little and enjoy conversation with friends and co-workers.

FAMILY

Argentineans usually live at home until they get married, so many of your Argentinean friends will still be living at home. People generally don't move far from the town or city where they grow up and typically stay close to an extended family network throughout their whole life. High value is placed on kinship, and a special relationship and even responsibility is expected among extended family members. Argentines are close communicators physically and will often touch each other when speaking and maintain little physical distance between speakers.

Health and Safety

Your health and safety is our number one priority. Please read and reference the Health and Safety section of the ISEP website for general information regarding health and safety abroad, and contact your ISEP Student Services Coordinator with any questions or concerns as you prepare to study abroad.

- Country information about Argentina can be found here. Please pay special attention to the sections regarding Safety and Security, Health and Local Laws and Special Circumstances. 

Note: Information sourced on this page is provided by the U.S. Department of State. Non-U.S nationals should disregard the Embassies and Consulates and Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements sections. 

- Health information for Argentina can be found here

-If you’re planning to bring your prescription or over-the-counter medicine on your trip, you need to make sure your medicine is travel-ready. More information can be found here, and please contact your Student Services Coordinator and Host Coordinator with any additional questions. 

Currency

MONEY MATTERS

Currency

The Argentine peso is issued in notes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100. Coins issued are 5, 10, 25 and 50 centavos, and 1 peso. Credit cards are used throughout the country, but bring cash (efectivo) when visiting smaller towns. The most common cards are American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Diners Club. Be aware of your credit card company’s policy for use in a foreign country as they might charge an extra fee for charges made in foreign currency. Also, if you are going to use your credit or debit ATM card, be sure to inform your local bank before leaving in order to not be locked out of your account.

To compare your currency to the Argentine peso, see http://www.xe.com.

Before leaving for Argentina, you may want to inquire about currency exchange at your local bank. The most important monetary tool you will use in Argentina is either a major credit card or debit ATM card. This is the cheapest and most efficient way to get cash and make purchases. Most Argentine banks charge a flat rate for making ATM withdrawals, so lessen your per-peso fee by withdrawing the maximum amount of money each time (usually between 500 and 1000 pesos, depending upon the bank and the card). As you would at home, be very careful and aware of your surroundings at all times, especially if you are carrying cash or have just been to an ATM.

Banks and exchange bureaus are usually open from Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

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